Part I: Introduction

High Tunnels and Other Season Extension Techniques

High Tunnels and Other Season Extension Techniques

High tunnels and season extension allow farmers to increase the availability of their crops beyond the traditional outdoor growing season. Premium prices and an extended income stream are some of the advantages farmers pursue with season extension techniques. High tunnel production has increased rapidly in recent years

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Are High Tunnels for You?

Are High Tunnels for You?

Adding a new program to your inventory? Smaller, often-temporary structures can provide the protection of a greenhouse to help jump-start a new line of ornamentals or edibles.

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What is a High Tunnel?

What is a High Tunnel?

High tunnels are unheated, plastic-covered structures that provide an intermediate level of environmental protection and control compared to open field conditions and heated greenhouses Cost Unlike commercial greenhouses that cost up to $20 per square foot to construct, high tunnels can cost as little as $0.50 per square

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Why are High Tunnels used?

Why are High Tunnels used?

Season Extension Compared to open field conditions, plastic-covered high tunnels result in a warmer production environment during late fall, winter and early spring seasons This offers the advantage starting crops earlier in the spring and harvesting them later in the fall Production during the winter season is

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Types of High Tunnels – Terminology

Types of High Tunnels – Terminology

A strict definition of a high tunnel does not exist, and the terminology may change depending on the structure’s use “Hoophouse” and “High Tunnel” are often used interchangeably For example, a market farmer might grow an additional crop of sunflowers in a “High Tunnel” after first frost,

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